img
polirom

Catalin Mihuleac

Biography

Catalin Mihuleac made his debut as a writer in 1995, with the short story “The Matilda University”, published in Timpul magazine. He went on to publish a collection of short stories titled Memorial Bedsit (Masina de scris, 1996; 2nd edition, Timpul, 2005); the novel The Disappearance of the City of Jassy (Institutul European, 1998; 2nd edition, Timpul, 2007); Unspecified Title (short stories, Polirom, 1999); Steppe Bar (short prose, Timpul, 2001); Good Night, Moron! (short prose, Cronica, 2003); Four Transition Pieces (theatre, Princeps Edit, 2003); Dud Setter (short prose, Polirom, 2004); Ten Multilaterally Developed Stories (short prose, Cartea Romaneasca, 2010). He is a highly rated playwright and productions of his work have been staged in a number of theatres around...

read more


Excerpt from

Critics about

Novel, Prose series, Cartea Romaneasca, 2014, 320 pages

Copyright: Cartea Romaneasca

Translation rights sold to: All rights available

Book presentation

America throughout the Pogrom unfolds on two seemingly divergent levels. The first, set in inter-war Romania and based on historical documents and accounts from the secret archives of the period, makes sensational disclosures about the social and political life and inter-ethnic strife of the time. The second is constructed around a family of American Jews in the 2000s, who have a business dealing in second-hand goods: a family seemingly without a past, whose members are guided solely by the pragmatic interests of the present day, where everything, from clothes to ideas and even nostalgia, is second hand. Two women with strong personalities will tie the two narratives together, and the key to their story, resting under the sign of a prodigious memory, which belongs both to the mind and the heart, will be revealed at the end, when the past miraculously dissolves into the present. The novel pleads for reconciliation with others, and above all reconciliation with oneself. It is an invitation to understanding and tolerance, which inge­niously links hundreds of lives and three historic cities: Jassy, Washington D.C. and Vienna.

TopBack


Excerpt from

Novel, Cartea Romaneasca, 2012, 240 pages

Copyright: Cartea Romaneasca

Translation rights sold to: All rights available

Book presentation

Catalin Mihuleac, “the most humorous author in Romanian literature today,” as literary critic Alex Stefanescu has called him, manages to raise his first smile even with the oxymoronic title of his novel The Adventures of a Bolshevik Gentleman. Written in the manner of a political satire, the novel veers ingeniously in the direction of the grotesque, pure fantasy, and lyrical burlesque, in a whirlwind of black humour. Ion Scutelnicu, a Bolshevik gentleman and steadfast comrade, an orphan with a sadistic past record, is assigned the mission of re educating, in the spirit of committed communist art, a rebellious young painter of licentious nudes, Emil Faure, who has had the temerity to stand up to the son of the dictator. The first step is to move him into an anthropophagous housing block Moloch, loyal to the system. The method applied brims with subtlety and cruelty, with results to match. With the coming of new times, the activist/torturer and his “generously sized” wife, comrade Ella (the artist’s obese former muse), become the protagonists, the living exhibits, of the horribly life like dioramas in a post revolution “Museum of Communism,” a perennial institution that is a huge success with the public.

 

TopBack




© Copyright Polirom 2008. All rights reserved.

Web design & development by: svc & smorkov
Concept by: Florin Lazarescu